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Lifesafety Services

Your fire alarm system will only operate properly if it is maintained and some impairments will not be obvious without testing! To meet the requirements of your local building department, fire inspectors, and even your insurance carrier, your system will need to be checked on a regular basis. The Codes and Standards set down by the NFPA and other agencies are there to guide us in the proper methodology and frequency of these tests

Regular testing is important because:
  • Your insurance carrier may reject your claim if you do not have proof of complete annual inspections.
  • It can limit your liability for any potential injuries suffered by tenants, employees, or guests to your business.
  • It will ensure that the system does not create nuisance alarms that waste Fire Department resources. This could put others’ lives in jeopardy and many jurisdictions will charge the building owner for multiple nuisance alarms.
  • It is required by the National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 72) - IT'S THE LAW.

As a building owner/business owner, it is important for you to have designated persons with some knowledge of the fire alarm system. Building maintenance personnel or other trained people are often able to do visual inspections, but yearly extensive testing must be done by a qualified state licensed inspector.

A fire alarm system is comprised of many different components, each with different testing procedures and frequencies. Please see the list below for the testing requirements of some of the more common components.
Portable Fire Extinguishers
NFPA-10
Portable Fire Extinguishers are an effective method to extinguish small accidental fires and/or supply occupants a means to create an escape path to safety. Various agencies, organizations and local authorities can mandate testing intervals. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) publishes the National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 10). This standard is for the installation for Class A, B, C, D, and K hazards as well as the selection, inspection, maintenance, recharging, and testing of portable fire extinguishing equipment. It also includes a list of obsolete fire extinguishers that should be removed from service. FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 10 and outlines the component testing based on your system configuration.
Water-Based
NFPA-25
Water based Extinguishing systems are the most efficient method of protecting property against fire loss. Various agencies, organizations and local authorities can mandate testing intervals. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) publishes the National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 25). This standard is for the Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Water Based Fire Protection Systems. NFPA 25 outlines the inspection and testing of piping, fittings and hangers, Wet and Dry System Tests, Flow Tests, Fire Pumps, Water Supplies and more. There are charts and table within the standard to describe the method and frequency of these component tests as well as a schedule of replacement for sprinkler heads, valves and other components. FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 25 and outlines the component testing based on your system configuration.
Alarms
NFPA-72
Fire Alarm Signaling Systems are the most efficient method of protecting life against fire loss. Most system manufacturers recommend at least one full system test annually after the initial acceptance test. Various agencies, organizations and local authorities can mandate testing intervals. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) publishes the National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 72). This standard is for the application, installation, performance and maintenance of Fire Alarm Signaling Systems. Based on the applicable revision, there is an entire chapter dedicated to Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Fire Alarm Signaling Systems. Within that chapter is charts and text which describe the components of the system and the method and frequency those components must be tested. FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 72 and outlines the component testing based on your system configuration.
Temporary Systems
Temporary systems, such as those found in buildings that are under renovation or demolition, are guided under NFPA 241, the Standard for Safeguarding Construction, Alteration and Demolition Operations.

This standard includes the requirements for not only the safe operation, testing and inspection of a Fire Control, but also the condition of the work areas.

The area should be well lit, clear of debris, and provide ample room for Firefighter equipment and access to all areas of the building.

FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 241 and outlines the testing based on your system configuration.
Exit Signs
NFPA-101 / OSHA 1910.37
Emergency Lights are intended to light the pathway to an exit door and Exit Signs show either the direction to or the exact location of the exit door. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) as well as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have developed standards for the application, installation inspection, testing and maintenance of these systems. FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 101 and outlines the testing based on your system configuration.
Wet Chemical
NFPA-17A
NFPA 17A is a set of codes and standards for wet chemical fire extinguishing systems that discharge wet chemical from fixed nozzles and piping by means of expellant gas. Requirements are specified for restaurant, commercial, and institutional hoods, plenums, ducts, and associated cooking appliances. Coverage includes components, system requirements, plans and acceptance tests, inspection, maintenance, and recharging.
Cooking Ventilation
NFPA-96
NFPA 96 is a set of codes and standards for ventilation control and fire protection of commercial cooking operations by the National Fire Protection Association. These are the standards that fire marshals follow and commercial cooking operations are required to adhere to. Standards include the inspection, testing and maintenance of not only the Fire Alarm Signaling Systems, but the condition of the Suppression System and the ventilation system of the associated kitchen units. FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of NFPA 17A and 96 and outlines the testing based on your system configuration.
Elevators
ASME-17
ASME A17.2 is a standard written by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and outlines the procedures for inspecting and testing elevators installed in buildings. Section 6 specifically addresses the operation of an elevator in "Firefighters' Service". FireMarshal.net follows the latest revision of ASME A17.2 Section 6 and outlines the testing based on your system configuration.